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Archive for the ‘Business’ Category

7 Crucial Money Tips to Failure-Proof Your New Business

Monday, October 24th, 2016

7 Crucial Money Tips to Failure-Proof Your New Business

Time is money, and both are especially critical for startups. Practice these skills until they’re second nature so your launch doesn’t crash and burn instead.

It’s easy for new business owners to get overwhelmed. You’ve seized a fantastic idea and you’re bringing it to life, but there’s a lot on your plate. At the same time, if you slouch on record-keeping or don’t spend money judiciously, you’ll crash and burn. And if you focus too much on the finances, your product or service will suffer.

Manufacturing startup Fab provides an infamous example. As Alyson Shontell starkly explained to Business Insider, “Jobs created then lost: 500. Value created then lost: $850 million. Money burned: $250 million.” Shontell also chronicled the end of Clinkle, a payments startup that dramatically failed to build and release an app somewhat like Apple Pay. I’d also bet you’re familiar with statistics that show 50 percent of new businesses fail in the first year and 95 percent fold before the five-year mark.

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Company failures continue to decline

Friday, September 30th, 2016

The latest figures show that an estimated 3,617 companies in England and Wales became insolvent between April and June – more than 4 per cent lower than during the previous quarter.

The total number of company insolvencies fell in the second quarter of this year.

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UK fintech startups raised £40 million in July, showing Brexit hasn’t killed the hot sector

Monday, September 19th, 2016

Revolut cofounders Vlad Yatsenko, left, and Nikolay Storonsky

UK fintech startups raised £40 million in July, showing Brexit hasn’t killed the hot sector

British fintech startups have announced at least £40 million of investment in just over a month since the referendum on the UK’s membership of the European Union, according to an analysis by Business Insider. Nine funding deals in the fintech sector totalling £40.6 million have been announced since June 23, when Britain shocked the world by voting to leave the European Union. While the figure should help to allay fears of a post-Brexit fintech slowdown, most of the deals will have been in the works for months and so may not be the best indication of investor confidence post-referendum. However, the fact that these deals weren’t called off in the wake of the vote is a positive sign. Investment is holding steady at the same rate as the start of the year. A report from KPMG earlier this year showed $162 million (£110.8 million) was invested in 15 UK-based fintech startups between January and April

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What Brexit means for accounting, employment and taxation law

Friday, August 19th, 2016

eu flag  brexit

WITH new UK prime minister Theresa May apparently determined to fulfill the wishes of the Brexit referendum result backing Britain leaving the European Union, what EU accounting and taxation laws will ultimately remain on the British statute? The PM has made it clear she recognises that a key force behind the ‘leave’ vote was a dislike of unrestricted EU immigration into Britain, and should she satisfy that demand, the prospect of the UK becoming a non-EU member of the European Economic Area (EEA) will become most unlikely.

Non-EU EEA states such as Norway and Iceland have to accept EU immigration (with some recourse to emergency controls in cases of social unrest) in return for admission to the EU single market for industrial goods and services, which of course includes accountancy. No such admission to the EU single market for services exists for Switzerland, which retains strong links with the EU, but which is also mulling EU immigration controls. So single market laws laying down rules on accounting, bookkeeping and company formation may not apply in Britain, assuming it will quit the EU, which could well happen within 2019 under the EU’s article 50 schedule for departing member states.

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U.K. economy grows 0.4% in Q1, business investment falls

Thursday, August 18th, 2016

© Reuters. U.K. GDP unrevised as expected

Investing.com – As expected, growth in the U.K. economy in the first three months of the 2016 went unrevised, although business investment suffered a downward revision in the final estimate released on Thursday. In a report, the Office for National Statistics said gross domestic product (GDP) expanded by a seasonally adjusted 0.4% in the first quarter, unchanged in this final estimate and in line with expectations. The U.K.’s economy grew by 0.6% in the preceding quarter. Year-over-year, U.K. economic growth grew 2.0% in the three months ended March 31, also in line with forecasts and unchanged from the prior estimate. The U.K. economy expanded at an annualized rate of 2.1% in the fourth quarter of 2015. Meanwhile, business investment fell by a seasonally adjusted 0.6% in the first quarter, below forecasts for the prior drop of 0.5% to be revised upwards to a 0.4% decline. That followed a decline of 2.0% in the preceding quarter.

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British business needs investment and vision. But most of all it needs purpose

Monday, May 23rd, 2016

British business needs investment and vision. But most of all it needs purpose

There is a quiet crisis in British business. The number of quoted British public companies has halved over the past 15 years. Too many famous names among those that are left – from oil to retailing – have been embroiled in scandals or have profound problems with their business model. There are only two hi-tech companies – ARM and Sage – represented in the FTSE 100. Fifty years ago there were dozens.

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